SOUTH AFRICA

South African homosexuals disturbing use of their own DNA to produce triplets VIDEO


This was NEVER what IVF was supposed to be about with a complicit media painting a positive spin on it.
South Africa scholars back Israel academic boycott VIDEO
South African president blames West for refugee crisis VIDEO
Oscar Pistorius' early release is blocked by justice minister VIDEO
South African MP calls Jacob Zuma a 'thief' VIDEO
Pistorius trial: justice a bloody joke when a judicial mafia rule VIDEO


  • judicial mafia are a fucking joke as Pistorius gets only five years for
    shooting dead his girlfriend (and might serve less than a year)
  • South African court allows anti-Israel billboards VIDEO
    Oscar Pistorius murder trial: firearms lawyer questions judge's verdict VIDEO
    South Africa's flawed legal system where a solitary judge decides the fate of Pestorius VIDEO


    Only a jury can provide an impartial decision so why are South Africans tolerating the judicial mafia?
    and judges can be bribed
    How is Pistorious still able to walk the streets while out on bail? VIDEO
    Oscar Pistorius goes on trial for murder so how the fuck is he still out on bail?


    oscar pistorius The South African courts are an utter joke from way back during apartheid they are still controlled by a judicial mafia hell bent on ensuring juries aren't restored that might provide some impartial judgements. Now if Pistorius was BLACK would he have been released on bail? If he was a poor white boy would he have been released on bail? NOOOOOOO but due to the continued protection of the ruling mafia by the judicial mafia Pistorius has remained a FREE man despite admitting he killed his girlfriend .

    This is maybe one of the weirdest twists in how laws are NOT ensuring justice but merely a smokescreen to punish the poorest and weakest while the white rich supremacists are getting away with murder.

  • FULL ARTICLE HERE
  • Oscar Pistorius trial for the murder of Reeva Steenkamp begins
  • Nelson Mandela 'received weapons training from zionists and Mossad agents in 1962'
    Secret letter lodged in Israeli state archives reveals South African icon underwent training under an assumed identity. The letter said Mandela was trained to use weapons and sabotage techniques, and 'the staff tried to make him into a Zionist'.

    Nelson Mandela apparently underwent weapons training by Mossad agents in Ethiopia in 1962 without the Israeli secret service knowing his true identity, according to an intriguing secret letter lodged in the Israeli state archives.

    The missive, revealed by the Israeli paper Haaretz two weeks after the death of the iconic South African leader, said Mandela was instructed in the use of weapons and sabotage techniques, and was encouraged to develop Zionist sympathies. Mandela visited other African countries in 1962 in order to drum up support for the African National Congress's fight against the apartheid regime in South Africa. While in Ethiopia, he sought help from the Israeli embassy, using a pseudonym, according to the letter – classified top secret – which was sent to officials in Israel in October 1962. Its subject line was the "Black Pimpernel", a term used by the South African press to refer to Mandela. Haaretz quoted the letter as saying: "As you may recall, three months ago we discussed the case of a trainee who arrived at the [Israeli] embassy in Ethiopia by the name of David Mobsari who came from Rhodesia. The aforementioned received training from the Ethiopians [a codename for Mossad agents, according to Haaretz] in judo, sabotage and weaponry."

    It added that the man had shown interest in the methods of the Haganah, a Jewish paramilitary organisation that fought against the British rulers and the Arab population of Palestine in the 1930s and 40s, and other Israeli underground movements. It went on: "He greeted our men with 'Shalom', was familiar with the problems of Jewry and of Israel, and gave the impression of being an intellectual. The staff tried to make him into a Zionist. In conversations with him, he expressed socialist world views and at times created the impression that he leaned toward communism. "It now emerges from photographs that have been published in the press about the arrest in South Africa of the 'Black Pimpernel' that the trainee from Rhodesia used an alias, and the two men are one and the same."

    According to Haaretz, a later handwritten annotation to the letter confirmed the Black Pimpernel was Mandela. The newspaper said the letter was kept in the state archives, and was discovered a few years ago by a student researching a thesis on relations between Israel and South Africa. The Israel foreign ministry website refers to a document which confirms a meeting between Mandela and an Israeli official in Ethiopia in 1962, but makes no explicit reference to the Mossad, or any kind of training. An entry dated 9 December 2013 says: "The Israel State Archives holds a document (not released for publication) showing that Mandela (under an assumed identity) met with an unofficial Israel representative in Ethiopia as early as 1962 … The Israeli representative was not aware of Mandela's true identity. Instead the two discussed Israel's problems in the Middle East, with Mandela displaying wide-ranging interest in the subject. Only after his arrest in 1962, on his return to South Africa, did Israel learn the truth."

  • FULL ARTICLE HERE
  • Mandela's daughter on his death VIDEO
    Obama selfie at Mandela ceremony missus is not impressed
    obama selfie

    The parasites that hang on to Mandela legacy

    Obama, Cameron, Clegg and Blair were some of the NWO lackeys that appeared at the Mandela celebrations in South Africa. These hypocritical bastards are the same mob that accuse anyone who disagrees with their fascist policies as terrorists. If it was not for Mandela's part in an armed struggle against Apartheid the black citizens would still be under the control of the white supremacists and the west and its leaders ALSO claimed the ANC and Mandela were TERRORISTS.

  • American government considered Nelson Mandela a terrorist until 2008
  • 'Fake' interpreter at Nelson Mandela memorial VIDEO


    Footage from a South African news channel shows a sign language interpreter at Nelson Mandela's memorial who has been accused of making signs up.

    The short clip also shows the South African Broadcasting Corporation's own deaf interpreter, who can be seen to be making different gestures to the signer at the Mandela memorial. The man, who signed for a portion of the ceremony including Barack Obama's speech, was simply making up his own signs, say the Deaf Federation of South Africa. David Buxton, the CEO of the British Deaf Association, said the unindentified man, who was supposed to be signing in South African, was "waving his hands around but there was no meaning."

    Mr Buxton said it was "childish hand gestures and clapping, it was as if he had never learnt a word of sign language in his life." He said sign languages across the world share a similar structure and pattern, but his were just repetitive hand movements.

    "It was hours of complete nonsense. He is clearly a fraud who wanted to stand on stage with big and important people. It's quite audacious if you think about it."
    American government considered Nelson Mandela a terrorist until 2008
    From the White House to the halls of Congress, U.S. government officials have responded to the death of Nelson Mandela with a hail of testimonials to the late South African president’s leadership in the struggle for freedom and human rights.

    Until five years ago, however, the U.S. officially considered Mandela a terrorist. During the Cold War, both the State and Defense departments dubbed Mandela’s political party, the African National Congress, a terrorist group, and Mandela’s name remained on the U.S. terrorism watch list till 2008. Presidents Carter and Reagan and Congress had all instituted sanctions against the white minority South African government because of its policy of racial apartheid. But in 1986, Reagan condemned Mandela’s group, the ANC, which was leading the black struggle against the apartheid regime, saying it engaged in "calculated terror ... the mining of roads, the bombings of public places, designed to bring about further repression." After the apartheid regime in South Africa declared the ANC a terrorist group, the Reagan administration followed suit.

    In August of 1988, the State Department listed the ANC among "organizations that engage in terrorism.” It said the group ''disavows a strategy that deliberately targets civilians,” but noted that civilians had “been victims of incidents claimed by or attributed to the ANC.” Five months later, in January 1989, the Defense Department included the ANC in an official publication, "Terrorist Group Profiles," with a foreword by President-elect George H.W. Bush. The ANC was listed among 52 of the "world's more notorious terrorist groups." (One of the others listed, Yasser Arafat's Fatah, is now the ruling party in the West Bank.) The publication referred to Mandela, who had once led the ANC’s military wing, as part of the "leadership," though by then he had spent more than a quarter century in prison. It also accepted the apartheid regime's claim that "ANC's operations -- which heretofore had sought to avoid civilian casualties -- abruptly changed. Attacks became more indiscriminate, resulting in both black and white civilian victims." Five months before the report was issued, the ANC had taken responsibility for some attacks that resulted in civilian deaths but had pledged to prevent a recurrence.

    Leaders around the globe remember Nelson Mandela's fearless generosity, leadership, and remarkable force for change. NBC's Andrea Mitchell reports. The report cited 13 attacks during the 1980s, many of which targeted government facilities, including a military command headquarters, an unfinished nuclear plant, a courthouse and SASOL, the government-owned coal-to-oil conversion facility. Of those incidents that resulted in deaths, the biggest was a car-bombing of the South African Air Force headquarters in Pretoria that killed 19 and wounded 200. The report also claimed significant links between the ANC and Communist countries, noting that the ANC "receives support from the Soviet bloc, Cuba and a number of African nations in addition to contributions from the West." The DoD report added that the ANC received many of its weapons from the "Soviet Bloc" and listed among its "political objectives" the establishment of a "multiracial Socialist government in South Africa."

    When the Defense Department’s report was issued, State quickly distanced itself from the harsh, Cold War rhetoric. Despite its own earlier dire characterization of the ANC, it called the group "a politically diverse organization, representing a range of views. It is the oldest black nationalist movement in South Africa." But the Defense Department stood by its language, and Mandela and other ANC officials remained on the terror watch list even as President Bush welcomed Mandela, newly released from prison, to the White House in 1990. Because of what was described as a "bureaucratic snafu," their names were kept on the list until 2008, 14 years after Mandela had been elected president and nine years after he had left power. He was 90 at the time. The terrorist designation finally proved too embarrassing for the U.S. government to ignore. In April 2008, during the last year of the George W. Bush administration, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told a Senate committee that her department had to issue waivers for ANC members to travel to the United States.

    "This is a country with which we now have excellent relations, South Africa, but it's frankly a rather embarrassing matter that I still have to waive in my own counterpart, the foreign minister of South Africa, not to mention the great leader Nelson Mandela," Rice said. Later that year, the terrorist designation was dropped after a bill, proposed by then-Senator now secretary of State John Kerry, passed both houses of Congress and was signed by President Bush. Mandela was imprisoned in 1964 after being arrested and charged with sabotage, specifically a campaign against the country's power grid, and plotting to overthrow the government. No one was injured in the sabotage campaign. He was released in 1990, at age 71. He was elected president of South Africa in 1994, in the country’s first full and free elections, and served until 1999.

  • FULL ARTICLE HERE
  • Mandela's legacy: peace, but poverty for many blacks
    Did South African freemasons do a deal with the ANC letting Nelson Mandela free?

    In the 10 years after he withdrew from public life, Nelson Mandela divided his time between a mansion in one of Johannesburg's wealthiest suburbs and his ancestral home in Qunu, a village in South Africa's impoverished eastern Cape. The contrast could not have been starker. In one, his neighbors were cast in the image of the white "Rand Lords", the mining magnates and bankers who built the sprawling city - and Africa's biggest economy - from the vast gold reserves in the rock beneath their feet.

    In the other, they were black peasant farmers living in thatched "rondavel" huts and eking out a living on windswept hillsides in scenes that have hardly changed in centuries, let alone the two decades since the end of apartheid. While few query Mandela's achievement in dragging South Africa back from the brink of civil war in the early 1990s and brokering a peaceful end to three centuries of white dominance, tougher questions are being asked of the country he leaves behind. Despite more than 10 years of affirmative action to redress the balance under the banner of "black economic empowerment", South Africa remains one of the world's most unequal societies and whites still control huge swathes of the economy.

    In the words of leading trade unionist Zwelinzima Vavi, its structure is akin to an Irish coffee - black at the bottom, with some white froth and a sprinkling of chocolate on the top. On average, a white household earns six times more than a black one, and nearly one in three blacks is unemployed, compared with one in 20 whites. Such ratios are fodder for critics of the 1994 settlement that brought the curtain down on nearly half a century of institutionalized white-minority rule and saw Mandela anointed South Africa's first black president.

    The numbers also support the anecdotal evidence from wealthy urban neighborhoods - including Mandela's Houghton - where, 19 years after the birth of his "Rainbow Nation", most of the black people to be seen are housemaids, security guards or gardeners. "Mandela has gone a bit too far in doing good to the non-black communities, really in some cases at the expense of (blacks)," Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe said in a documentary aired on South African television in May 2013. "That's being too saintly, too good."

    POLITICAL OR ECONOMIC POWER?

    The defenders of Mandela's settlement note that Mugabe's violent seizure of white-owned farms in neighboring Zimbabwe from 2000 triggered an eight-year economic collapse and confirmed his fall in the eyes of outsiders from respected liberation hero to international pariah. Yet his criticism of Mandela finds echoes in some corners of the African National Congress (ANC), the 101-year-old liberation movement that joined forces with the unions and the Communist Party to topple apartheid. In a 2010 interview with the wife of British author V.S. Naipaul, the anti-apartheid firebrand and "Mother of the Nation" Winnie Madikizela-Mandela accused her former husband of selling out after being broken by his 27 years in apartheid prisons.

    "Mandela did go to prison and he went in there as a burning young revolutionary. But look what came out," she was quoted as saying. "Mandela let us down. He agreed to a bad deal for the blacks. Economically, we are still on the outside. The economy is very much 'white'. It has a few token blacks, but so many who gave their life in the struggle have died unrewarded." Even among academics, there is broad acceptance that in its sparring with then-president FW de Klerk in the early 1990s, the ANC under Mandela, a self-confessed economic novice, focused too much on the quest for political rather than economic power.

    In less polite terms, the ANC's stance translated into a quip popular at the dinner parties of wealthy whites: "We'll give them the vote but keep the banks." William Gumede, a professor at Wits Business School in Johannesburg, said it was wrong to argue that Mandela sold out. "However, the economic negotiations were not as robust as the political ones," he said.

    "There was a glib acceptance among most in the ANC that all they needed to do was capture political power, and then they could transform the economy. It was a simplistic argument, and it was also the Mandela argument." South Africa and the world watched in awe when, on February 11, 1990, Mandela left Cape Town's Victor Verster prison and raised his fist in salute to the crowds as he stepped out on his and the nation's "Long Walk to Freedom" - the title of his subsequent autobiography. The start of a momentous political transition, it was also a key moment in the evolution of a cult of Mandela both at home and abroad.

    MAN AND MYTH

    In 1993, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with de Klerk, and in 1995 he won over all but the most diehard right-wingers as he saluted the overwhelmingly white Springbok side that won the Rugby World Cup in Johannesburg. He is immortalized in a stained glass window in Soweto's giant Regina Mundi church; statues of him dancing, boxing or raising his fist are dotted across the country; and in 2012 the central bank issued a set of bank notes bearing his face. The announcement about the notes came on February 11, the 22nd anniversary of his release from prison.

    In such an atmosphere, it was perhaps inevitable that some episodes of his single five-year term as president are glossed over. His close personal friendship with Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi drew criticism - and a fierce rebuttal from Mandela, who said: "Those who feel irritated by our friendship with President Gaddafi can go jump in the pool." The 2010 "blood diamonds" testimony of British supermodel Naomi Campbell at a Hague war crimes tribunal also shone an uncomfortable light on a dinner Mandela hosted in 1997 for Liberian warlord Charles Taylor, whose presence at the table called into question South Africa's 'ethical' foreign policy.

    Then there is the infamous 'Arms Deal', a $5 billion defense equipment contract that erupted into a massive scandal for Mandela's successor, Thabo Mbeki, and remains the defining episode in the ANC's slide from post-apartheid grace. Amid fierce criticism of Mbeki and the current president, Jacob Zuma, also embroiled in the furor, many South Africans have chosen to forget that the deal was first announced in 1998, when Mandela was still in office. On the streets of the sprawling black township of Soweto, where police and disgruntled unemployed youngsters still face off in sporadic, violent protests over poor housing and public services, there are plenty who do not buy the Mandela myth.

    "Mandela kept on saying: 'I am here for the people, I am the servant of the nation.' What did he do? He signed papers that allowed white people to keep the mines and the farms," said 49-year-old Majozi Pilane, who runs a roadside stall selling sweets and cigarettes. "He did absolutely nothing for all the poor people of this country."

  • FULL ARTICLE HERE
  • Was Mandela persecuted by South African freemasons until he joined Prince Hall freemasonry ?
  • From a giant to a thug: While Mandela's greatest feat was saving South Africa from a bloodbath, President Zuma has plunged it into violence, corruption and poverty
  • Ex-official: Cia Helped Jail Mandela
  • Freemasons: Masters in Africa
  • DANGERS OF PRINCE HALL FREEMASONRY White man's trick on Black American men
  • NELSON MANDELA IN LONDON IN 1962 MEETING SPOOKY PEOPLE
  • South African freemasonry expanded into accepting black initiates in 1977
    freemasonry south africa
    Zionist Clinton pays tribute to 'terrorist' Nelson Mandela VIDEO

    The west classed the ANC fight against racial apartheid as terrorism
    Obama pays tribute to Mandela the hero formerly classed as a terrorist by the west VIDEO
    Cameron pays tribute to former 'TERRORIST' Nelson Mandela VIDEO
    Nelson Mandela's first TV interview in 1961 VIDEO


    From 'terrorist' to president
    Royal parasite pays tribute to former 'TERRORIST' Nelson Mandela VIDEO
    Mandela turned prison number into inspiration VIDEO
    NELSON MANDELA DIES AGE 95
    nelson mandela


    THE WEST SUPPORTED WHITE SUPREMACISTS IN SOUTH AFRICA WHO CLASSED MANDELA AS A TERRORIST

    South Africa's first black president and anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela has died, South Africa's president says.

    Mr Mandela, 95, led South Africa's transition from white-minority rule in the 1990s, after 27 years in prison. He had been receiving intense home-based medical care for a lung infection after three months in hospital. In a statement on South African national TV, Mr Zuma said Mr Mandela had "departed" and was at peace.

    "Our nation has lost its greatest son," Mr Zuma said. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate was one of the world's most revered statesmen after preaching reconciliation despite being imprisoned for 27 years. He had rarely been seen in public since officially retiring in 2004.

    "What made Nelson Mandela great was precisely what made him human. We saw in him what we seek in ourselves," Mr Zuma said. "Fellow South Africans, Nelson Mandela brought us together and it is together that we will bid him farewell." Earlier, the BBC's Mike Wooldridge, outside Mr Mandela's home in the Johannesburg suburb of Houghton, said there appeared to have been an unusually large family gathering. Among those attending was family elder Bantu Holomisa,

    A number of government vehicles were there during the evening as well, our correspondent says. Since he was released from hospital, the South African presidency repeatedly described Mr Mandela's condition as critical but stable. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 and was elected South Africa's first black president in 1994. He stepped down after five years in office.

    Nelson Mandela

    1918 Born in the Eastern Cape

    1943 Joined African National Congress

    1956 Charged with high treason, but charges dropped after a four-year trial

    1962 Arrested, convicted of incitement and leaving country without a passport, sentenced to five years in prison

    1964 Charged with sabotage, sentenced to life

    1990 Freed from prison

    1993 Wins Nobel Peace Prize

    1994 Elected first black president

    1999 Steps down as leader

    2001 Diagnosed with prostate cancer

    2004 Retires from public life

    2005 Announces his son has died of an HIV/Aids-related illness


  • FULL ARTICLE HERE
  • Time line: Mandela, ANC and the crushing of white supremacist rule in South Africa (Classed as terrorism by the global gutter press)
  • Was Mandela persecuted by South African freemasons until he joined Prince Hall freemasonry ?
  • Are South Africa's masonic judiciary keeping Pistorius out of jail? VIDEO


    No juries in South Africa ensure masonic tyranny
    SOUTH AFRICA CREATES NEW GLOBAL BANK VIDEO


    A new global bank is being born in South Africa - where the world's top emerging economies are meeting. The new financial powerhouse would be a direct challenger to the World Bank and the IMF - both dominated by the US. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa also green-lighted a new, mammoth crisis fund - and hinted they would ditch the dollar.
    Who polices the South African police? VIDEO
    SOUTH AFRICA'S COP BRUTALITY EXPOSED VIDEO


    Police in South Africa have come under fire again after mobile phone footage emerged of a group of officers tying a Mozambican taxi driver they had arrested to a police van and dragging him along a road.

  • Taxi driver dies after he is arrested and dragged behind police van in row over parking
  • THOUSANDS OF SOUTH AFRICAN MINERS SACKED VIDEO


    Anglo American Platinum - the world's largest platinum producer, has sacked up to 12,000 miners in South Africa for staging what the company said unlawful strike. The industrial action has also spread to other mining industries with over 75,000 miners striking across the country. South Africa, which produces an estimated 75 per cent of the world's platinum supply, has been facing labour unrest in recent weeks over the issue of pay rise.
    SOUTH AFRICA BEGINS INQUIRY INTO 34 STRIKING MINERS MURDERED BY COPS VIDEO


    Six weeks after 34 striking miners were shot dead by police at a mine in South Africa, a Judicial Commission of inquiry has begun. The inquiry will look into events at the Marikana mine and start by focusing on the days leading up to the shooting.
    EXPOSING ARCHBISHOP DESMOND TUTU VIDEO


    This clip highlights the exact moment Freedom Central came face to face with Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, and asked him if he would help revoke the policy of Crimins Solicitationas. This Vatican law protects child raping clergy, and commands all clergy to cover up these crimes.
    SOUTH AFRICANS NO BETTER UNDER BLACK RULE VIDEO


    Police have used tear gas and rubber bullets on striking miners. The workers at the Anglo American Platinum mine near Rustenburg want a pay increase.

    Fellow miners at the nearby Lonmin plant secured a 22 per cent pay rise on Tuesday. But the settlement does not resolve lingering questions about union rivalry at the heart of the violence, or the underlying class struggle.
    SOUTH AFRICA'S NEW HARD LINE TACTICS AGAINST STRIKING MINERS VIDEO


    South African police have fired rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse protesters at a platinum mine where 45 people were killed over a deadly wage dispute that erupted at the beginning of August. Saturday's show of force followed a government threat to halt illegal protests and disarm strikers who have stopped work at one gold and six platinum mines northwest of Johannesburg. The strikes have destabilised South Africa's critical mining sector. It was the first police action since 34 miners were killed on August 16 when security forces opened fire at the Marikana mine. About 500 officers raided hostels at Lonmin PLC platinum mine before dawn and confiscated homemade machetes, spears, knives and clubs, police spokesman Brigadier Thulani Ngubane said.
    SOUTH AFRICAN MINERS UNITE OVER PAY AND MURDER OF COLLEAGUES VIDEO


    Thousands of people have descended upon marikana in a display of solidarity with the striking miners, all saying the workers' pay rise demand is "non-negotiable". But without a return to work, mediators, unions and mine bosses say they will walk away from talks. Up to 40,000 jobs are threatened at the Lonmin platinum mine, officials have said.
    KEY SOUTH AFRICAN MINE UNION REFUSES TO SIGN 'PEACE ACCORD' VIDEO


    South African miners, arrested after the Marikana shooting, have been released by a Pretoria court while key players refused to sign a deal to end a deadly strike. More than a 100 miners were held in a South African jail after being charged last week under an obscure apartheid-era security law with murdering their fellow miners, after video footage indicated that police had fired on the strikers. On Thursday, a key union representing the strikers as well as other non-unionised workers refused to sign a peace accord to resume wage negotiations, saying that it would force them to end their strike.
    STRIKERS MARCH ON SOUTH AFRICA'S PLATINUM MINE VIDEO


    Thousands of striking miners have marched near Johannesburg trying to gain support for their pay demands. It is the biggest demonstration since police shot dead 34 workers at the Marikana mine last month. South Africa relies heavily on the lucrative mining industry - and the demonstrations are starting to have an effect.
    THOUSANDS PROTEST AT PLATINUM MINE WHERE COPS MASSACRED STRIKERS VIDEO
    JOURNALIST GREG MARINOVICH SPEAKS ABOUT SOUTH AFRICAN MINE SHOOTING VIDEO

    EXECUTION BY COP MAY LED TO CIVIL WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA

  • South Africa Strikes, after mass murder by cops, spread to gold mine (VIDEO)
  • SOUTH AFRICA PLAGUED BY MINING CRISIS VIDEO


    Miners gunned down by police, wildcat strikes as workers demand better treatment, and unions fighting sometimes violent turf wars. Many observers say South Africa's mining industry is in crisis. It's one of the world's most lucrative, with gold, platinum and diamonds among the minerals that bring in some $12bn annually. Our correspondents are standing by: Tania Page at a courthouse near Pretoria, and Haru Mutasa at a gold mine where thousands of workers are on strike. We also talk to Patrick Craven, the spokesman for South Africa's top trade union body in Johannesburg.
    SOUTH AFRICAN STRIKES SPREAD TO GOLD MINES VIDEO


    Workers at the world's fourth largest gold mine have gone on strike in South Africa. Some 12,000 miners in Johannesburg walked out in a dispute about pay and conditions. This comes weeks after 44 people were killed during protests at the Lonmin Platinum mine in the country's northwest. Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports from the Goldfields mine.
    SOUTH AFRICAN MINE SHOOTING HIGHLIGHTS POLICE BRUTALITY VIDEO


    The killing of 34 striking miners in Marikana was the worst incident of police violence in South Africa since the end of apartheid in 1994. Though the miners were armed with clubs and machetes, and Al Jazeera cameras captured at least one firing a gun, the police response has been criticised as excessive, and the resulting investigation as potentially flawed. For the parents of one young man killed by police who thought he was hiding a gun, the Marikana incident reflects procedure that has become too standard.
    LUNACY IN SOUTH AFRICA AS MINERS (NOT COPS) ARE CHARGED WITH MURDER VIDEO


    South African authorities have used a law last used in the apartheid era to bring murder charges against 270 miners involved in unrest at the Marikana mine earlier this month. The 270 workers would be tried under the "common purpose" doctrine because they were in the crowd which confronted police on 16 August, an official said. Police opened fire, killing 34 miners and sparking a national outcry
    SOUTH AFRICAN MINERS VILLAGE FURY AT COP MASS MURDERS VIDEO


    AFRICAN MINERS GET A TASTE OF THINGS TO COME FOR INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS ACROSS THE GLOBE?

    South African opposition politicians are calling for the government to be held responsible for last week's violence at a platinum mine. A total of 44 people, including 34 shot by police on Thursday, have died after protests for better working conditions and pay turned violent. At Wonderkop mining village, where most of the miners who were killed resided, tensions remain high.
    MINING COMPANIES EXTRACTING HUMANITY VIDEO


  • South Africa Miners didn't deserve what they got(VIDEO)
  • SOUTH AFRICA LONMIN MINE SHOOTING: WHO IS TO BLAME? VIDEO


    Police who shot and killed 34 striking miners say they fired in self-defence. But what was behind this brutal police crackdown and how will it play out politically in South Africa?
    SOUTH AFRICAN PRESIDENT LAUNCHES PROBE INTO STRIKING MINERS MASSACRE VIDEO


    The women of a South African community are coming to terms with a week of bloodshed that culminated with the deaths of 34 workers were shot by police on Thursday during a protest at the Lonmin platinum mine in Marikana. Some have described the incident as a massacre while police are at pains to outline their case for using lethal force.
    PROTESTER SHOT ON CAMERA BY SOUTH AFRICAN COPS IN BRUTAL CRACK DOWN VIDEO
    TOP SOUTH AFRICAN COP GETS 15 YEARS FOR CORRUPTION
    jackie selebi Johannesburg, South Africa (AHN) - A South African court has sentenced former National Police Commissioner Jacob (Jackie) Sello Selebi (60) to 15 years imprisonment on corruption charges.

    In his verdict, South Gauteng High Court’s Judge Joffe Meyer said, "You were an embarrassment to the office that you occupied". Interpol’s ex-president Selebi was convicted last month for accepting bribes of $156,000 from a drug kingpin identified as Glenn Agliotti, who wanted Selebi to turn a blind eye to his business in return. "At no stage during the trial did the accused display any indication of remorse. The accused lied and fabricated evidence in an effort to escape the consequences of his conduct," the judge said.

    Selebi is free on bail for next two weeks during which he is expected to file an appeal against the verdict. While the judge announced the verdict, there was complete silence in the courtroom, even his wife and other members of the family did not react. Later, Selebi's brother George told reporters that an apartheid judge sentenced his brother. Prosecutors, on the other hand, hoped that the court had given a strong message that no form of corruption would be tolerated in the country. Justice Meyer said that he chose the minimum sentence for Selebi because it was the first offense by the 60-year-old police officer. The minimum sentence in South Africa is 15 years. However, he added that he could not ignore corruption by a top officer and its affect on the society.

  • SOURCE
  • State prosecutor argued that former South African national police commissioner should be convicted of corruption
  • SOUTH AFRICA RIFE WITH POVERTY BUT NO SHORTAGE OF CASH FOR STADIUMS
    SOUTH AFRICA

    It seems that despite overcoming the evils of apartheid and finally getting rid of the white supremists, South Africa still remains under the control of a corrupt government. The townships that existed during apartheid remain, yet the government have spent millions on creating 10 new sports arenas for the world cup.

    Sport seems to be a far greater priority than the living conditions of the poor South African people who still live in utter squalor and deprivation . London is going the same way with the coming Olympics that are costing billions to create the sports stadiums, while millions still live in squalid conditions. Greece has all but been bankrupted after having spent so much on the Olympics at the utter expense of the ordinary citizens of Greece. When the powers that be say there is NO MONEY it is an utter nonsense as when they want to find the money for their exclusive sporting events, that the ordinary South Africans cannot afford, they will. Just like the many billions being spent on science projects like the International Space Station and Cerne that billions are poured into while the world's poor starve and are denied the basics of life. Those running this world have very different priorities from the ordinary victims of their extravagant and outrageous spending.

  • South African stadiums built for 2010 world cup(VIDEO)

  • SOUTH AFRICAN WHITE SUPREMIST LEADER STABBED TO DEATH VIDEO

    A notorious South African white supremacist leader was killed Saturday by his own employees, police said, in an apparent dispute over wages. Eugene Terreblanche, the 69-year-old leader of the neo-Nazi Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging (Afrikaner Resistance Movement, or AWB), was bludgeoned and stabbed to death on his farm with clubs and a machete, police said. Two of his farmworkers turned themselves in to authorities in connection with the killing. No other details were immediately available.

    Terreblanche's AWB is best known for trying to block South Africa's effort to end apartheid. The group used terrorist tactics in a bid to stall the country's first all-race vote in 1994, killing more than 20 people in a wave of bombings on the eve of the elections. Terreblanche was convicted of the 1996 attempted murder of Paul Motshabi, a black man who worked as a security guard on Terreblanche's farm. He served about two-thirds of a five-year sentence. He also was convicted of setting his dog on a black man in an earlier incident. His death Saturday comes amid a time of heightened racial polarization in the country. A South African court last month banned the playing of a political song called "Kill the Boer," most recently sung by radical youth leader Julius Malema. The apartheid-era song's lyrics translate to "kill the farmer."
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